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Bulk Licorice

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Licorice (also spelled "liquorice") is the sweet flavor extracted from the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra. Anise is a similar flavor, but botanically unrelated. The magic of licorice is yours with bulk amounts of chewy licorice laces, bites, beans, bites, drops, ropes and all sorts for added variety. Between the brightly-hued mixes and single-color selections, a complex of colors awaits the palate and the eyes. Individually wrapped options are available for treats to share or to offer in a candy bowl. The large number of licorice choices keeps licorice lovers busy any time, with a favorite topic.

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Additional Information

How is Licorice Made?

First of all, it's important to distinguish between real licorice and imitation licorice. Red licorice is a misnomer. The red product that is called licorice is not a "true" licorice because of what it is made from and its flavor (typically strawberry, cherry, or another 'red' color). Instead, true licorice is the black stuff, made from extracts of the roots of the licorice plant "Glycyrrhiza glabra" with the well-known, distinctive licorice flavor.

Once we understand which is the 'real' licorice, then it is time to learn how it is made. The basic process begins with licorice root extract, sugar, and a binder such as starch (flour) or gelatin or a combination. The three ingredients are dissolved in water and then heated to about 275 °F. To achieve specific shapes, upon completion, they may be poured into molds. Following formation, they can be wrapped. Licorice comes in an almost infinite variety of sizes and shapes, from a meter-long novelty at a fair in Finland to wheels and other shapes better known on this side of the Atlantic. Gumballs.com is a great place to stock up on both "real" black licorice in several different forms as well as the red licorice that is enjoyed so much in this country.

Why Are There Different Spellings: Licorice/Liquorice?

The two different spellings are regionalisms. "Licorice" is the spelling most commonly used in the USA; "liquorice" is "British English" for the same product. It is likely that the two different spellings have arisen as an expression of historical independence. Regardless of how you spell it, Gumballs.com sells bulk licorice candy ! Stock up on it as soon as you can!

The pop quiz mentioned elsewhere on gumballs.com: Who invented the first mass-produced game of the type named in the category in which the answer is found?